The Future of work: Intelligence versus Artificial Intelligence

By Thea Sokolowski (an extract)

Particularly in developing countries, where an increase in disposable income, population and access to technology, as well as investments in infrastructure and construction, will increase demand for work. However an estimated “75 million to 375 million workers (3 to 14 percent of the global workforce) will need to switch occupational categories.”

These shifts will demand that policy makers, regulators and corporate executives embrace the coming technological shift while planning ahead for the transitional strains likely to be felt by the working class.

“Which jobs will be automated first? The jobs that computers do better than humans. That sounds terrifying, but we are really removing jobs where computers do a better job and humans can move on to do more value-added jobs.” – Jorn Lyseggen, Meltwater Founder & CEO. Between almost zero and 30% of the hours worked globally could be automated by 2030.

Most important is the focus on data. “Where things can’t be automated, the data will be used to help you understand how you work and improve what you do.” This will in turn be used for performance management and will lead to human work that is increasingly more intellectually challenging.


Between almost zero and 30 percent of the hours worked globally could be automated by today’s directors are facing unprecedented challenges, demands, and expectations that amount to a new mandate for boards.


Even with automation, the demand for work and workers could increase as economies grow, partly fueled by productivity growth enabled by technological progress.” – from the McKinsey report “What the future of work will mean for jobs, skills, and wages.

 

Particularly in developing countries, where an increase in disposable income, population and access to technology, as well as investments in infrastructure and construction, will increase demand for work. However an estimated “75 million to 375 million workers (3 to 14 percent of the global workforce) will need to switch occupational categories.

 

These shifts will demand that policy makers, regulators and corporate executives embrace the coming technological shift while planning ahead for the transitional strains likely to be felt by the working class.